Horizon 2020 Forthcoming Calls you may be interested in

Dear Colleagues,

We’ve read over the Horizon 2020 forthcoming calls and…
There are a group of forthcoming calls in the Horizon 2020 work programme(.pdf) that might be applicable to our sector – and that you may want to consider applying to.

Collaboration between academic partners and SMEs (Small-to-Medium Enterprise) are usually desirable in these calls – i.e. you will apply as a collaborating group not as an individual business. It should be noted that you will need to be a well established business, with rigorous accounting practices and capable of handling a hefty administrative workload to be able to participate as an SME.

We’ve gone through adding a little detail to each call – below. Please contact us if you would like help applying or sourcing project partners etc, via alicemarie.archer@gmail.com

NB – Renumeration of EU funded work depends on the role of your organisation in the proposal. It is typically 60-80% funded, but can be as much as 100% funded for activities considered impossible to co-fund.


With an investment of €1.3 billion, the Societal Challenge 2 (SC2) Work Programme for 2018-2020 responds to some of the key challenges our planet is facing for the years to come: adapting to and mitigating climate change; ensuring food security; safeguarding the natural resource base, promoting alternatives to fossil-based economies and sustainably using marine resources while protecting the oceans. Agriculture and food systems, forestry, the marine and the bio-based sectors are at the very heart of the challenges to be addressed. SC2 Work Programme focuses on the sustainable management of land and waters to secure healthy food as well as on the delivery of public goods such as biodiversity and clean water. Furthermore, it supports innovative food and marine industries, the bioeconomy and dynamic rural areas. The solutions arising from SC2 activities are expected to deliver significant economic, environmental and social benefits. Investments for example will focus on the promotion of biodiversity rich agriculture and healthy and safe food, on increasing animal welfare, on the sustainable management of soils and on the development of microbiome applications, on the implementation of Food and Blue Clouds, supporting Food 2030 and pioneering a digital revolution and new value chains in rural economies. New ideas, products, technologies, policy recommendations and social innovations will work in tandem to provide a supportive framework for genuine improvements in the way we produce and consume.

 


Innovative and citizen-driven food system approaches in cities.

Deadline: 23 January 2019 17:00:00

Specific Challenge:

The challenge of providing the inhabitants of European cities with affordable, safe, and nutritious food is both urgent and complex. Moreover, the health and wellbeing of EU citizens and consumers are directly affected by the way cities and regions themselves are shaping a sustainable food environment. Research and (open) innovation co-created with citizens are part of broader city-region food system approaches. Such initiatives stimulate the development of cities as innovative food hubs. Nevertheless, there are barriers to the application and demonstration of systemic food-related innovative approaches due to the diversity of European cities and regions that are not well understood, leading to market failure in the uptake of promising research results and innovation in cities. Demonstration and first application in the market of innovative solutions, co-created with citizen and cities with the involvement of public authorities, economic actors and non-profit organisations, could be one way to support sustainable food security in cities.

Focus area: Connecting economic and environmental gains – the Circular Econonmy (CE)

[read more]


Food Cloud demonstrators

Focus area: Digitising and transforming European industry and services (DT)

The European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) will federate existing and emerging research data infrastructures, and provide researchers with services for Open Research Data (ORD) storage, management, analysis and re-use across disciplines. The move towards a thematic EOSC section for food and nutrition security (FNS) – or Food Cloud – would accelerate and support the ongoing transition to a more Open Science and Open Innovation model for food and nutrition systems, stimulate intra- and interdisciplinary research, and increase the impact and efficiency of research investments and infrastructures. It would address the increased complexity of data sharing and analysis as well as reproducibility within and across scientific disciplines, as well as the sharp growth in data volumes. Although the components needed to create a first generation Food Cloud are largely there, they are fragmented, spread over EU Member States and across different scientific communities, and lack interoperability. There is a lack of widespread awareness of the value of open research data and of incentives and possibilities for data sharing. There is no dedicated and mandated effort or instrument to co-ordinate EOSC-type activities within the area of FNS research.

[read more]

Deadline: 23 January 2019 17:00:00

Alternative proteins for food and feed

Focus area: Building a low-carbon, climate resilient future (LC)

Specific Challenge:

While facing climate change and natural resource scarcity, ensuring sufficient, nutritious, safe and affordable food to a fast growing world population with changing dietary habits becomes increasingly challenging. The protein supply is in this respect most critical, both for human consumption and animal feed. Integration of a variety of new or alternative protein sources from both terrestrial and aquatic origin into new and/or existing processes or products needs to be explored, in order to develop and ensure more sustainable, resilient supply chains, featuring high consumer acceptability by a clean labelling approach and attractive market opportunities.

Deadline: 23 January 2019 17:00:00

[read more]


 

Climate-smart and resilient farming

Focus area: Building a low-carbon, climate resilient future (LC)

Specific Challenge:

Evidence on climate change is solid and reveals that it will affect the EU with European farming first in line through changes to rainfall regimes, rising temperatures, the variability and seasonality of the climate and the occurrence of more frequent extreme events (heatwaves, droughts, storms and floods). In addition to finding effective solutions for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation such as reducing GHG emissions and sequestering carbon below and above ground, farmers will need to adapt to climate change and develop farming systems resilient to fluctuating environmental and socio-economic conditions.

Deadline: 
2nd stage Deadline:
23 January 2019 17:00:00
04 September 2019 17:00:00

[Read More]


Integrated water management in small agricultural catchments

Specific Challenge:

Tackling both quantity and quality of water in small agricultural catchments provides a number of advantages. The number of hydrological processes and interactions can be analysed in detail which is not the case for large scale hydrological analyses. Usually issues of natural/small water retention[1] can be properly tackled at the smaller scale of an agricultural catchment. Equally, the local impact of climate change or/and changes in local micro-climate can also be analysed in an integrated way with other challenges of small scale catchments. At the level of the small agricultural catchment, water management supports not only sustainable agricultural production but also local ecosystems. A sufficient supply of water for sustainable crop production might become more important in the coming years. At the same time a number of underutilised techniques of water management (natural/small water retention, nutrients recovery from streams, etc.) could be re-introduced into agricultural management for the benefit of farmers, local communities and the environment.

Deadline: 
2nd stage Deadline:
23 January 2019 17:00:00
04 September 2019 17:00:00

[read more]


 

ERANETs in agri-food

Deadline: 23 January 2019 17:00:00

Specific Challenge:

The agri-food sector[1] is subject to multiple external pressures, such as rising demand for food, competition for land and other natural resources with other biomass uses, globalisation, threats from animal or plant diseases, environmental and climatic changes and public health considerations. Climate change will further impact the agri-food sector both directly through its effect on production at EU level, but also indirectly through its supply chain. This implies the need to become more efficient and sustainable; improve its impact on consumer health; take advantage of new technological developments; and become more transparent and responsive to consumer demands, within a food-system approach.

A. [2019] ICT-enabled agri-food systems

Today, despite increased information demand from consumers and food chain players alike, Europe’s food businesses and farmers are slow at adopting digital technologies. This is due in part to the inherent complexities of relevant products and processes, and in part to the dynamically changing open network organisation of the food sector with its multitude of SMEs, its cultural diversity, its differences in expectations and in the ability to serve transparency needs. The agri-food sector needs to take more advantage of the potential of digital technologies. Relevant technologies may include Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Big Data technologies, remote and localised sensing. This sub-topic will engage the agri-food community in supporting the development of solutions to remove the barriers to adoption of digital technologies, taking a multi-actor approach across different supply chains (conventional and organic) from farm to fork. These solutions will be targeted to supporting third party development of a variety of digital technologies which can take advantage of, integrate with, and complement the standardisation efforts and platform developments in other Horizon 2020, European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) and regionally/nationally-funded projects. In addition, this sub-topic will support the development of new data-driven ICT platforms and solutions which derive value for multiple actors from the data collected throughout the food chain, thereby enabling new business models which will increase the affordability and adoption of such solutions, reduce the environmental footprint, increase system resilience, and empower consumers. Interregional and international cooperation will be encouraged and complementarity with other ERA-NETs will be ensured throughout the project development stages by means of active collaboration and communication. When relevant, projects should consider synergies with the Thematic Smart Specialisation Platform on Agri-food (TSSP-AF)[2] and related interregional partnerships under the Research and Innovation Strategies for Smart Specialisation (RIS3).

Deadline: 23 January 2019 17:00:00

[read more]


 

Sustainable European aquaculture 4.0: nutrition and breeding

Bit of a wild card this one – but some of our members may have interests in these areas:

Focus area: Digitising and transforming European industry and services (DT)

Specific Challenge:

European aquaculture[1] provides 1.25 million tonnes of seafood annually[2], valued at over 4 billion euro. However, Europe heavily depends on external markets to ensure consumer demands for seafood (including from fresh water) is met. EU aquaculture needs to increase the competiveness of its food products and to respond to consumer demands for high-quality and safe food, in a challenging context of climate change, greater competition for natural resources, and conflicting interests for space and markets. To ensure food and nutrition security by 2030, European aquaculture has to sustainably expand in terms of space, production and new value chains, exploring and enhancing innovation opportunities offered by sustainable and resilient aquaculture production systems, implementing the circular economy principles and increasing social acceptance of the corresponding activities and products. European aquaculture has now a unique opportunity to address not only today’s challenges of climate change and food and nutrition security, but also to implement the international commitments encompassed in the UN SDGs, while fostering economic growth and social prosperity.

Scope:

Activities shall develop smart breeding programmes and/or tailor feeding formulas and technologies for conventional and organic aquaculture – for marine and/or freshwater – targeting animal health (contributing to disease resistance) and welfare, different production systems, feeding efficiency, resilience and climate change mitigation – when applicable, including related traits and possible links between them (synergies, trade-offs) -, zero waste, by-products valorisation following circularity principles and organoleptic and nutritional values of seafood optimisation. Efforts to close the reproduction cycle of economically important species should be considered. In addition, activities shall explore the potential of the microbiome on health and productivity of farmed species.[3] Activities shall consider sound cost-effective production methods and profitability, testing, demonstrating and upscaling of the production processes to pre-commercial product. Regulatory authority and consumers should also be consulted, addressing their concerns and demands. The use of Internet of Things (IoT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) should be considered. The participation of deep-tech start-ups is encouraged. Activities shall develop a set of indicators to monitor and measure progress towards the expected impacts as listed in the call text and in particular the improvement of the production systems that increases productivity, resilience and sustainability. The interdisciplinary and cross-sectorial nature of the project should also apply to training activities improving the professional skills and competencies and supporting the creation of new jobs in the blue economy.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the range of EUR 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be adequately addressed. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Deadline: 23 January 2019 17:00:00

[Read more]